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Breastfeeding Vs Bottle-feeding


Breastfeeding Vs Bottle-feeding : Choosing the best feeding method for your baby is a personal decision.


The American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP) recommends breastfeeding for the first year of life, but this may not be possible or desired for all mothers and babies. If you are unable or choose not to breastfeed, iron-fortified infant formula is a safe and healthy alternative.


Regardless of the feeding method you choose, most providers recommend "ad lib" feeding. This means feeding your baby when they show signs of hunger, rather than on a strict schedule. For most newborns, this will be about every 2-3 hours. It is important to be patient and responsive to your baby's cues, whether you are breastfeeding or bottle feeding.



Breastfeeding baby


Breastfeeding


Breastfeeding is a great way to nourish your baby and give them a healthy start in life. However, it can be challenging at first, and most mothers and babies need some help learning how to do it.


In the first few days after birth, your breasts will produce colostrum. Colostrum is a thick, yellowish liquid that is packed with antibodies and nutrients. It is important for your baby to get colostrum, as it will help protect them from infection and give them a boost of immunity.


After a few days, your breasts will start to produce transitional milk and then mature breast milk. Mature breast milk is thinner and whiter than colostrum, and it contains all the nutrients your baby needs.


Most babies need to be fed every 2-3 hours, or 8-12 times a day. Signs that your baby is hungry include:

  • Moving their head from side to side

  • Opening their mouth

  • Putting their hands in their mouth

  • Rooting (opening their mouth when their cheek is stroked)


Once your baby is latched on, watch for signs that they are actively nursing:

  • Swallowing

  • Sucking rhythmically and deeply

  • Moving their jaw

  • Their cheeks may "suck in"

Signs that your baby is full include:

  • Slowing down or stopping sucking

  • Turning away from the breast

It is important to be patient and persistent when breastfeeding. It may take some time for you and your baby to get the hang of it. If you are having any problems, don't hesitate to ask for help from a lactation consultant.


Breast milk is a great source of nutrition for babies, but it does not contain enough vitamin D. Vitamin D is important for healthy bone growth, so breastfed babies need to be supplemented with vitamin D. Vitamin D can be bought over the counter in a variety of forms.


Your baby is feeding well if they seem satisfied, are having 6-8 wet diapers a day, several bowel movements a day, and are gaining weight.


Bottle feeding



Iron-fortified infant formulas are a safe and nutritious alternative to breast milk. They are available in a variety of brands, but Enfamil and Similac are the most popular.


For most babies, cow's milk formula is recommended. However, your healthcare provider may recommend another type of formula, such as soy, lactose-free, or hypoallergenic, depending on your baby's individual needs.


Infant formulas are supplemented with vitamins and minerals, including vitamin D, so most formula-fed babies do not need additional supplements.


Formula comes in three forms:

  1. ready-to-feed.

  2. concentrated liquid

  3. powder.

Ready-to-feed formula is the most convenient, but it is also the most expensive. Concentrated liquid and powder formula are less expensive, but they require more preparation.


When preparing formula, it is important to follow the instructions on the label carefully. Using too much or too little water can make the formula too concentrated or too diluted, which can both be harmful to your baby.


Most babies do well with cool or room-temperature bottles. If your baby prefers a warm bottle, do not heat it in the microwave. Microwaves can heat unevenly and cause the formula to be too hot in some spots. Instead, warm the bottle by running it under warm water for a few minutes.


Always hold your baby during a feeding. Never prop the bottle and leave your baby unattended. Propping bottles can lead to ear infections, tooth decay, and choking.


Refrigerate any prepared bottles of formula that you do not use immediately. Prepared bottles of formula can be stored in the refrigerator for up to 24 hours. Discard any bottles that have been left out of the refrigerator for more than 1 hour.


Formula-fed newborns typically take from 1/2 to 1-1/2 ounces of formula every 2-3 hours. As your baby gets older, they will need to eat more formula more often.


Signs that your baby is hungry include:

  • Moving their head from side to side

  • Opening their mouth

  • Putting their hands in their mouth

  • Rooting (opening their mouth when their cheek is stroked)

Signs that your baby is full include:

  • Slowing down or stopping sucking

  • Turning away from the bottle

If you are concerned that your baby is not feeding well, talk to your healthcare provider.




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